Mechanisms of Ingroup-Outgroup Discrimination

Hello everyone, my name is John Haight and this summer I will be conducting research using an EEG to record participants’ brain waves for a study on the mechanisms of ingroup-outgroup discrimination.  EEG stands for electroencephalogram and it is used to record electrical brain-wave activity from participants over the course of an experiment.  EEGs are especially useful for research in social psychology since they are able to instantaneously record brain activity as participants are reacting to stimuli.  When this brain data is averaged over many participants, researchers can look to see how the participants’ brains reacted to the presented stimuli, and see if there are relationships between groups within the participant pool to certain stimuli.

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Summer Birding

Hello all! I’m a rising junior, and I’m going to be spending the summer studying variations in bird diversity along an urbanization gradient. I’ve spent the past few weeks taking early-season point counts, which requires waking up at sunrise and bushwhacking through the woods to a randomly-selected point, then recording all the species seen or heard in three ten minute sessions. The past few days have been pretty overwhelming. Just differentiating calls from the chorus of chips and whistles and trills is hard enough, but then having to recognize the calls and estimate distances to them gets pretty confusing. As soon as I think I’ve got one species’ call down, I hear a new variation of it, or another species comes along that sounds nearly identical. It’s definitely been a long learning process, but each day I recognize more species, and the point counts get a little bit easier. I look forward to the day that it all fits together, and I no longer confuse the ovenbird for a Carolina wren or label any high-pitched squeak as a goldfinch.

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All About Health Care

Hello everyone! My name is Eytan, and I’m a rising senior majoring in Economics at William and Mary. This Summer, I will be working on two projects related to health care. First, I will be working with my advisor, Professor He, on examining changes in Medicare legislation. Medicare is a government sponsored form of health care primarily for individuals over the age of 65 (younger individuals with  specific types of disabilities are also eligible).  In 2000, Medicare changed the way in which outpatient hospital expenses were reimbursed. Previously, outpatient hospital visits were reimbursed based on the exact cost of the treatments. Under the new legislation, the Outpatient Prospective Payment System, expenses are classified into different categories , depending on the type of treatment. Thus, the exact cost of the expenses is not reimbursed, but rather a set amount is paid based on the classification of the treatment. This change in policy could affect how much medication patients receive , and how likely they are to receive outpatient surgery.

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Summer of Sand Dollars!

Hello,

My name is Frances and I will be spending the summer at the Bowdoin College Marine Laboratory working on a research project testing the consequences of environmentally induced multiples (twins, triplets etc.) in the sand dollar Echinarachnius parma.

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Representations of Women in Teen Vampire Culture

Hello, fellow William and Mary students, and welcome to my Charles Center Summer Research Blog. I’d like to start this blog post out by introducing myself. My name is Rebeca, and I’m a senior psychology major and women’s study minor at the College of William and Mary. I’ve been granted this scholarship to study an issue which has always been near and dear to my heart-the portrayals of women in teenage vampire culture over the last decade, with a particular focus on the Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Twilight phenomena.

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