Half-way done with interviews

On our first Sunday, we woke up at 6am, and met with Pedro and two economists from Lima who would be assisting ACCA as the castañeros began work on a new business to sell castañas. We drove about 3 minutes until we reached the river, and, still waiting for the completion of the Inter-Oceanic Highway bridge, waited about 10 ten minutes for a wooden car ferry to load our van on, and ferry us across the river. We then drove around 2 hours north, in order to reach the forested areas where the brazil nuts are in enough concentration to allow commercial harvesting.

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June 2nd: My Arrival in Puerto Maldonado

Well, the last time I posted on this blog was April 12, and my in-country research has both begun and ended by now, and I have been back in the USA for over a week now. However, possessing an internet connection in the Amazon jungle which could hardly load HTML Gmail, much less upload pictures onto WordPress, I thought it best to simply wait until I returned to the land of DSL to continue my blog posts. However, I will attempt to write as though I was in the moment, and thus will begin this post starting with my arrival in Puerto Maldonado.

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Beginnings of the Research Process

At this point, I have not really been able to formally begin my research, as I had some trouble submitting information to the Protection of Human Subjects Committee.  My project has now been approved, and I am definitely prepared to go through that process if I ever need to again!  I have, however, been involved in some related activities, including volunteering at the Waterman’s Museum.

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Watermen of the Chesapeake Bay

My name is Lindsey Carver, and I am a rising senior at the College of William & Mary.  This summer I will be conducting research to support the writing of my undergraduate honors thesis in Anthropology.  I am focusing on the community of Guinea in Gloucester, Virginia.  Watermen from Guinea have fished the waters of the Chesapeake Bay, a major source of oysters and blue crabs, for centuries.  However, the bay has seen a decline in oysters and crabs in recent decades.  Over-harvesting in the past, decline in water quality, and the spread of oyster diseases has contributed to this decrease.  Maryland and Virginia have instituted regulations to protect the populations of oysters and blue crabs, affecting the fishermen’s ability to make a livelihood on the water as they did in the past.

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