The Intangible Assets of Brand

Moore (2003) writes on the notion exactly what constitutes brand and how brand is created by marketers and perceived by consumers. His article in the journal Language & Communication, entitled “From genericide to viral marketing: on ‘brand,'” attempts to portray brand as “an inherently unstable composite of tangible (e.g. product) and intangible (e.g. brand name) values” (331) and he makes use of a Peircean semiotic framework in order to demonstrate the ways in which this is true.

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Post 5: Final Thoughts about the Summer

Hello again!

Well, the summer is officially over. I’ve put in 10 long weeks of work and I’ve accomplished quite a bit. While this series of blogs has been focused on my honors thesis project, I’ve also been working on the tRFLP project described in last summer’s blog series. With that project, I have gotten fragment data for every month from Mat 2009 to August 2010! The next step is the analysis of the fragments and creation of dendrograms to compare similarity in the bacterial community in each month over the course of the year. I’ve got my work cut out for me there too!

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Post 4: Mini Prep Mayhem

Hi All,

To recap – I began the summer by extracting bacterial DNA from 0.22 micron filters that held bacteria from Lake Matoaka. I then amplified the 16s rRNA gene by PCR. These amplicons were ligated into plasmid vectors, transformed into E. coli cells and hundreds of copies of each amplicon were made. What’s next? Since the end goal is to sequence the bacterial 16s gene, I need to get the plasmid back out of the E. coli cell. Enter: Mini-Prep kits. These are brilliant little kits that have made the process of removing plasmid DNA much easier.

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Post 3: Transformation Nightmare!!

Hi All,

You’re probably dying to know the results of the transformation reactions that I set up last post! Sorry it’s taken me so long to get back to you all!

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Trouble With Transcribing

My research involves taking interviews in Russian and then transcribing them and then translating them into English. The most difficult part for me is the transcribing. It is hard enough to make complete sense of what someone is saying to me in Russian when I can see their body language and facial expressions. It is that much harder when I have to do it with only the recording. I have done this before on another project with a group of students and it worked pretty well. Now, however, I am working on my own research and the task of transcribing is quite daunting. Luckily, the Chappell Scholarship involves close work with a faculty advisor and this is immensely helpful in making sense of the interviews that I have. The opportunity to work with my advisor, who is a native Russian speaker not only provides me with the ability to complete my research, it also enables me to improve my own language skills and understand Russian culture better. This whole experience again highlights the best aspects of William & Mary. Being in a great academic environment and working one-on-one with a professor on my own work is teaching me a fantastic amount and not strictly in the academic sense. Doing my own research has taught me a lot about where my own interests lie and how I want to go about exploring those passions. Also, it has made me realize all of the preparation and time that goes into producing something of value and gives me a great appreciation for those who dedicate their lives to this kind of work. I am so glad to have had this opportunity and encourage other students to get involved in undergraduate research.