Class is Almost Over…

 

Making the headband

[Read more…]

The Dodge Collection, “Nonconformism,” and Three Weeks Down

I’ve been in Europe for approximately three weeks now, and have just less than a month left. It’s amazing how quickly time flies, and how much can happen that makes posting to a blog so much more difficult. This blog post has been on my to-do list since the day before I left the states, but various obstacles, from lack of internet-access, through reading and homework assignments, to purposefully getting lost on the streets of St. Petersburg, have gotten in the way. But here I am, mere hours from an early-morning departure for a weekend in Moscow, finally getting one of these blog posts out of my system and off my conscience.

[Read more…]

Rating Curves in All the Right Places…

While plenty of rain has come down in Williamsburg over the past month, not enough rain has fallen on our farm to trigger flow in our stream.  As a result, we’re continuing to analyze samples from the last major flow event in April.  This is a good thing because the analysis of the April storm has turned out to be more complex than we initially anticipated.

[Read more…]

Yay New LIDAR!!

The end of last week came with a pleasant surprise of new 1.5m LIDAR being available for several counties in the Coastal Plain of Virginia. This meant I would be able to utilize the most current elevation data with the highest possible resolution. In my last post I explained how the 2m vs. 10m tests proved the 10m to be just as effective as the 2m and earlier this week I performed the same comparison using the new LIDAR. The results were very similar. A plot of the cumulative fraction drained along the field margin with both DEM resolutions showed the two to be matching exceptionally well. The higher resolution sets do allow for more accuracy in tracing the field margin, yet this doesn’t seem to cause a change in determining flow accumulation entering and exiting the field. This is great news! This allows me to analyze flow concentration on numerous fields as I am not restricted by the availability of high resolution data.

[Read more…]

Getting Started (Part 2)

While these past few weeks have been heavy on collecting data and light on actual data analysis, several aspects of this research have been extremely interesting. The process of finding historical articles which document the empirical relationship between immigration and crime has been particularly fascinating. The assertion that immigrants exhibit higher rates of delinquency than their native born counterparts has been posited in numerous articles since the beginning of the 20th century. For example, in his article, “Problems of Immigration”, Frank P. Sargent (the Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization from 1902-1908) suggests that most immigrants add a “dangerous and unwholesome element” to American society and should thus be carefully inspected upon arrival (1904). Sargent emphasizes that immigrants who “become burdens … the indigent, and the morally depraved, the physically and mentally diseased, the shiftless” should not be allowed to enter the country.

[Read more…]