Summing Up

As my summer winds down, I have to say goodbye to this wonderful journey. What was originally three to five pages double spaced is now nearly two hundred pages of typed interviews, thoughts, and outlines. Colorful photos of vineyards, gardens, and smiles fill my computer. My stories have prompted laughs, arguments, and interest among my friends. I’ve spoken to restaurant owners, farmers, lawyers, shop owners and tour guides and visited cheese factories, vineyards, schools, and butcher shops.  Despite all this information, however, I’m left with more questions than I started with!  All my remaining questions provoked me to change my class schedule in hopes of gaining some insight into the areas that still interest me. What I found most fascinating throughout this summer was Why do we eat what we eat? and Why can fresh, local, organic food be the cheaper option? Because of this, I have signed up for a Biological Anthropology class in hopes of gaining some knowledge about cultures, traditions, and the history of our species. I’ve never taken an anthropology class but it sounds interesting! Also, I signed up for two economics classes. Throughout the summer, the one consistent theme I found was that people’s finances heavily influence their decisions. I would love to do some more research on the government’s role in subsidizing commodities as well as how international trade affects the price of goods sold domestically. I’m finding more and more that although there are some dedicated foodies out there determined to always eat local and fresh produce, the majority of individuals just buy what is cheap, available, and convenient. It would be fascinating to learn more about how all these things numbers take effect in the market. Along with my new classes, my school job consists in increasing Aramark’s procurement of local goods, so I know that this will not be the end of visiting farms and looking into these questions! I truly hope that I will find the support, through friends and teachers, to continue pursing this project that I have come to love. Finally, I’ve included some photos that I took while my mother and I went to visit Benziger Winery, a biodynamic vineyard in northern California. I’ll be showing photos from everywhere that I went when I present my project to William and Mary in the fall. To anyone that read my posts, I hope you enjoyed them and please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any comments or are just a mutual lover of food! I also would like to thank William and Mary for providing the support needed to pursue this project. I couldn’t have done it without the donations of generous alumni parents and I am grateful that they made this memorable summer possible.

Comments

  1. After reading this post, I’ll have to go back and read the rest! When you said, “I’m finding more and more that although there are some dedicated foodies out there determined to always eat local and fresh produce, the majority of individuals just buy what is cheap, available, and convenient” I found it to be a spot on observation. I would love to be able to eat local/organic food products, but I find it hard to do so on a college budget. I hope your continued studies find a way to present good and affordable alternatives!

  2. Katie Demeria says:

    Hi Wesley – your research was really, really interesting. I’m taking two classes that have to do with the environment this semester, so reading what you had to say will, I think, give me even more talking points in that class. It’s great to hear that you have more questions now, even though your summer is over, and I hope you have the chance to explore them further.