Unknown and Unheard: A Peculiar Narrative on Southern Integration

Hi everybody! I’m so excited to be here! I’m Jamesha Gibson. I am a History major and a rising Junior. This summer I will be conducting Oral History interviews in the grand ol’ state of South Carolina. My research project is an exploration into southern school integration unlike any other.

[Read more…]

Analyzing Social Networks in Chaguite, Nicaragua and Understanding their Affects on Community Health Introduction and Abstract

Hello! My name is Roni Nagle. I am a freshman and a biology major with a public health minor. I have been involved in sociological research with the MANOS team (Medical Aid Nicaragua: Outreach Scholarship) throughout my freshman year. Our projects overarching goal is health centered and we travel to a small, rural community Chaguite, Nicaragua every Spring. We also travel on auxiliary trips during Summer and Winter break. As our project is health focused, I have learned how sociology can be used to study health and health care access within the community. Readings throughout the year as well as research performed by other team members and my faculty advisor Professor Aday have spurred my interest regarding health and communication.

[Read more…]

Samurai Abroad: Introduction and Research Abstract

My name is Isabel Bush, and since January, I have been studying abroad through William & Mary’s Oxford Sponsored Semester Programme.  Oxford, for me, is perfectly encapsulated by Evelyn Waugh in the first chapter of Brideshead Revisited.
“…I went full of curiosity and the faint, unrecognized apprehension that here, at last, I should find that low door in the wall, which others, I knew, had found before me, which opened on an enclosed and enchanted garden, which was somewhere, not overlooked by any window, in the heart of that grey city.”
I found my low door in a wall one Thursday, five weeks into my first term, when I attended a lecture at Oxford’s Nissan Institute for Japanese Studies, entitled “Samurai Abroad: Photographs of the Takenouchi Mission to Europe (1862),” presented by researchers from the Pitt Rivers Museum. While the Takenouchi mission (1862), and its related Ikeda mission (1864) have not been completely neglected by historians, their significance is often scrutinized only as a part of a larger diplomatic effort by the Japanese government in the late nineteenth century, instead of as a Tokugawa-era forerunner to the empire-building of the Meiji Restoration. In 2011, the Pitt Rivers was able to mount an exhibit on the two missions based on their collection of ethnographic photographs from the missions’ stay in Paris. Since then, this research has been continued, albeit on a smaller scale, which led to the presentation that I saw at the Nissan Institute.
My research goals are to build on the Pitt Rivers’ work thus far, and, in gratitude for the help and access I have been granted, I will combine my individual research goals with those of the museum, in order to ensure that this collection receives its due attention. I will examine the objectives of Takenouchi and Ikeda missions in comparison to those of Meiji-era missions, and to analyze their successes, their failures, and their legacies in modern Japanese diplomacy. I will attempt to track the backgrounds of individual envoys in the missions (as far as my language abilities allow), and what their presence indicated about the governmental objectives in the early Japan’s reopening. Furthermore, I will analyze the imagery that was created about the envoys in the countries they visited, starting with the Pitt Rivers’ photographs from Paris. I will use these images to discuss the modern formation of Japanese imagery abroad, and how that imagery is consumed both outside and inside Japan to this day.

[Read more…]

Cross-cultural Examination of Oxytocin and Trust

Hello! My name is Jennifer Fay. I’m a rising junior and a Psychology major. I’ve been interested in psychology since I first started taking classes of it in high school. I’ve also been fascinated with different cultures which comes in part from the fact that I have lived abroad most of my life, moving from one country to another every few years. So when I began studying at William & Mary, I knew that wanted to work in Professor Schug’s Cross-culture Psychology lab. And it is with her that I will be doing research with this summer as well as in collaboration with Dr. Keiko Ishii at Kobe University in Japan..

[Read more…]

Spatial Distribution across the Virginia Peninsula of the Lone-Star Tick, a Vector for Disease

Hi, my name is Molly Teague and I’m a rising Junior, majoring in Biology and French.  My summer will be spent on campus doing research with Matthias Leu, a professor of conservation biology and GIS.

[Read more…]