Week 2: Richmond, Roanoke, and Records (that were sealed)

What a week this has been. A good 15 hours on the road and many hundreds of miles later, I have interviewed two physicians, a Planned Parenthood administrator, a nurse practitioner, and a grassroots rep, spanning from Richmond to Roanoke to right here in Arlington.

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Cooking: Understanding through Experience

I never would have expected that moving into my own house would cause the truths that these authors espouse to jump off of the pages I’ve been reading in such a real way.

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Week One in Nicaragua! Piloting the Protocol.

Prior to leaving for Nicaragua I worked with Professor Aday to decide what aspects of communication we would like to look at and analyze using social network analysis. My teammates and I read the article, “Social Network Analysis for Organizations”, written by Noel M. Tichy, which outlines the main SNA methodologies. In prior research conducted by MANOS members, students have used the “reputational method” to interview community members, asking questions such as “who works on the behalf of the community”. We decided that this round we’re going to focus on the “transactional content”. We are looking for direct communication regarding health and we’ll also be looking at how often these interactions occur and where they occur.

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Being Lost and Getting Found in the Whirlwind World of Research

When I began my project I was extremely confident in my ability to research good information. In the numerous research experiences of my History classes I had acquired a process. First, I would choose an interesting topic. Then I would embark on the most important part: researching evidence. I would normally go to Swem’s library catalogue or research database (or in exceptional cases, Special Collection’s database) and search the topic, or subjects associated with the topic. At the end of this process, the most difficult obstacle would be filtering and organizing the copious amounts of information.

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All the World’s a Stage: Process, Irony, and Trying on Shoes

When given this blog assignment, I was asked to discuss the process of my research in order that you might become a part of my “intellectual journey.” To that end, I want to share with you what it looks like for a nineteen-year-old undergraduate to be a religious studies professor’s  research assistant. While my next post will primarily deal with some compelling findings from the content I studied this week, I can’t help but share a little bit of it with you now. Otherwise, you won’t understand how amusing and deeply ironic it is that I’m being asked to focus on the “process” of my research.

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