World Health Organization

My research has been progressing well. I have interviewed doctors and nurses, but I still have not been able to interview any patients.  This is going to be a huge hurdle for my research as I am trying to get all the perspectives of individuals that are involved in the health care delivery system—and patients are a huge part of that system.  Patients refuse to sign my forms; either because they have never signed a form before or they feel like they are giving me permission to abuse the information they tell me. No matter how much I try to explain to patients the true nature of my research, I have not been successful in convincing them to talk to me.

 

After not being able to overcome this huge hurdle, I took a break from researching the governmental aspect of the health care delivery system to researching the nonprofit aspect of the health care delivery system.  This week I worked with the World Health Organization (WHO) branch in Sierra Leone. I was not able to formally interview any of the employees at World Health organization, because I needed to put it in a formal request–which I failed to do prior before arriving. Even with this huge error on my part, employees at WHO still allowed me to listen to their stories and listen to the problems they have with the system.

 

From the conversations I heard, I realized that the nonprofit aspect of the health care delivery system is suppose to complement the private and governmental aspect of the health care delivery system but often, they butt head instead.  Employees at WHO expressed difficulties with working with the private and governmental aspect of the health care delivery system because of the different regulations and procedures followed by the employees of different aspects of the health care delivery system. One example given by WHO employees is that WHO requires employees to put in a two-week notice to retrieve funds to participate or support a project. But most government and private sector programs usually depended on donor funds whether they happen or not, therefore government and private sector policy is to announce these programs when funds are in—usually a week before the event happens.  This short-term notice given to WHO workers prevents them from supporting many projects or partaking in projects.

 

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