Empowering Citizen Monitors in Uganda

Hey all!  My name is Justin DeShazor and this summer I’ll be working with Transparency International – Uganda as part of a joint partnership with the AidData Center for Development Policy, where I currently supervise a team of undergraduates who track and geocode development projects according to their purpose and geographic location.  I’ve been with AidData for almost two years, helping them produce an extensive database which provides this project-level geospatial information in a publicly-available format.  During this time, I also spent a semester with the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations in Washington D.C. utilizing AidData’s research products to inform the committee on foreign aid distributions in priority countries.  These experiences, which complement my double major in government and economics, have helped me to gain an immense appreciation for both the scale of the challenges in international development and the potential for policymakers and implementing partners to bring about meaningful progress when armed with accurate and accessible information.  Because Transparency International – Uganda has striven for over a decade to support such transparency and accountability, I am so excited to travel to Kampala (in my first trip outside of the United States) and participate in their work.

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Scribing: Roles and Infrastructure in a Non-Profit Clinical Setting

Hello World! My name is Linh Vinh and I am a sophomore Sociology and Neuroscience major at the College. I am currently a scribe at Lackey Free Clinic and volunteer at Olde Towne Medical Center, a rural health center. For my research, I plan to create a proposal for the initiation of a scribe program at Olde Towne Medical Center.

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Effect of Cell Cycle Inhibition on Neuronal Phenotype: An Introduction

Hello! My name is Gladys Shaw. I’m a rising senior and biology major at the College. I love working in the lab, and enjoy the ability to learn something new, and possibly novel, everyday. This summer, I will be investigating what occurs in neural development when the cell cycle is inhibited during gastrulation of the developing organism.

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The Laudatio Turiae as a Bridge between Eras

Hello all! My name is Mary McCulla, and I am a sophomore Classical Studies Major here at the College. For my research, I will be traveling to Rome, Italy to study the laudatio funebris (ancient Roman eulogies proclaimed publicly and then written on a gravestone) known commonly as the Laudatio Turiae (“In praise of Turia”). Dated to the reign of Augustus Caesar, the Laudation Turiae can tell us much about the time period between the Republic and Empire, and what those turbulent time periods meant to the Roman people. To uncover some of this information, I will be focusing my research first on the physical appearance of the stone and quality of its Latin and then I will focus on the content and meaning of this elegy.

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Ground-Truthing Aid in Uganda

Hi, my name is Rebecca Schectman and I will be spending the summer in Kampala working as an AidData Summer Fellow with UNICEF Uganda. I’m currently a sophomore at William and Mary and am studying International Relations. I also work as a Research Assistant with AidData, a research and innovation lab that seeks to make development finance more accessible and actionable. My job primarily involves geocoding aid projects, or assigning locations to project activities financed by USAID, the World Bank, and other development organizations. The idea behind geocoding is that better visualizations will improve development outcomes by improving aid distribution, informing policy, and maximizing impact. This summer, AidData is sending students abroad to work with organizations in the field that share similar goals.

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