Finishing Interviews

After I completed my last 5 interviews, I had a totally of 10 which was my goal for my time in Trinidad because I was hoping to get somewhere between 10 to 15 interviews. I thought the interviews were very helpful in gaining insight into the problem of colorism because I was able to understand it through someone else’s perspective and ask questions. Since the people that I asked all different and did not know each other I was able to get all sorts of answers. One thing I wish I had done differently was to investigate what were the times that the school was open and closed so I would have been able have done my literature review before I came to Trinidad because I felt ready to discuss colorism and hold a conversation with them. However, I did not feel knowledgable about the topic in the context of the Caribbean because I did not have enough time to prepare for my interviews so I had to do it in reverse. Overall I thought the interviews went very smoothly.

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Beginning the Interview Process

So I completed my first 5 interviews and so far they were all good. One thing that I noticed that I wished I could have done differently was try to recruit more students of different skin colors. For the most part i did not have any one that had a lighter skin tone. I tried asking my aunt how I could potentially reach out to more of the students that had a lighter skin tone but my Aunt said that most females that are lighter skin color will probably not talk to me about colorism because they benefit more readily from the system than those who are darker. In my interviews I was able to learn some terminologies or word choices for people. Blacker skin is compared to vultures because they have a darker skin tone and are seen as the lowest of the low because they are scavengers, dirty and ugly. Instead of people with lighter skin called light skins they are called red or red bone because of hue that shows up in their skin. Some people call black people a blackie and say that red woman are cheaper than a dollar bill. Funny enough the one dollar bill in Trinidad is red. This means that people who have a lighter skin are not worth much because they are usually viewed as dishonorable people.

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Finding Participants

So When I arrived in Trinidad. I asked my Aunt to help me find Participants at the University of West Indies. since she went to that school. I talked to her about some of the tools and resources that I could use to help me find students. She recommended that it would be best just for me to walk up to students around campus and introduce myself and ask them to interview them. At first I was planning on working on the literature review but my aunt informed that the students at the University will be leaving campus soon because the school  year was ending. So she took me down to the university to talk to some students.

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A Reflection on and Summary of my Zebrafish Research

Today as I reentered the zebrafish lab, I felt a sense of both accomplishment and victory. I had many goals coming into this summer which included producing high effort in the lab, managing my time effectively, and committing to the sometimes mundane process of research. Another one of these goals was to make a scientific impact through the finding of something different – a new test that biologists could use to test zebrafish with different types of manipulations. I am pleased with my performance over the summer as I felt I did what was necessary to be successful in research. This time, the kind of success I was striving for did not come; but with time, I believe there will be a breakthrough.

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Self-Efficacy in Community Lead Health Initiatives- Follow-up

The SOMOS team and the CdS certainly have a lot to show for our work this summer. Attached is the final version of the Health Prioritization Survey that we created. Over the next few months, CdS members will carry out this survey, and the results will help them to shape future health outcomes and access to health resources and education in their community. However, more than just the outcome of the survey, the results of our work are seen in the progress the CdS made this summer in building their capacity as a community health organization. Though the community still has a long way to go, the CdS will continue to play an influential role in enabling the community to take control of health outcomes and the resources that are available to them.

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