Abstract: Tuning the pKa of Fluorescent Rhodamine pH Probes via Substituent Effects

Hello!

My name is Sarah Stratton and I am a junior chemistry major. I have been working in Professor Harbron’s research lab since the fall of my freshman year, where I have been studying rhodamine dyes which fluoresce in acid. Specifically, we have been modifying the structure of these dyes to determine how the size and electronic properties of the molecule impact the pH at which the molecule fluoresces. This project has also been lovingly referred to as the “pink project” because the rhodamine derivatives I work with are clear in basic solutions and bright pink in acidic ones. Having stained various surfaces in the lab as well as some articles of clothing, I can personally attest to the tenacity and eye-popping color of these dyes!

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What’s the True Value of a Cell Phone?

Hello!

My name is Jonah Abraham, and I’m a sophomore at the College. This summer, I’ll be traveling to Tanzania to do my project, currently laboring under the clunky working title “What’s the True Value of a Cell Phone?” (If you have a snappier title, let me know in the comments!) In any case, I’ll be there for around seven weeks, living in the Tanzanian capital, Dar es Salaam. I’m working with three others students from W&M, and together we are all working on various aspects of Professor Roessler’s research.

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Abstract: Early Marriage and Sexual and Reproductive Health among Mahadalit Youth in Bihar, India – a Community- Based Participatory Research Approach – Blog Post #1

Hi everyone,

I am extremely grateful to the Charles Center and Sharpe Scholars Program for helping me fund my summer research! I have been working on this research proposal for two years now, having started developing the proposal my first semester, freshman year with a great deal of support from Professor David Aday through his Sharpe seminar “Communities & Neighborhoods: Class, Space, and Race” and his research methods course. I also reached out to Professor Camilla Buchanan, my professor for Introduction to Epidemiology and an MD/MPH who I felt could also give me great advice on conducting public health research at the community level. After freshman year, I got in touch with “Pathfinder International: India,” a nonprofit that offered me support for my research, which I will conduct this summer, alongside their implementation project in the Katihar, Saharsa, and Purnea districts of Bihar.

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Analyzing Greenspace on Campus with the Parks Research Lab

Hi everyone!

My name is Abigail Bradford, and I’m a junior double-majoring in Environmental Science and Classical Archaeology.   This summer I am very excited to have the opportunity of working with Dr. Ibes and other student researchers in the Parks Research Lab.  Last semester, I took an Environmental Science seminar called Campus Parks Research with Dr. Ibes.  In this seminar, we tested the effects of varying levels of “indoor green” on a person’s mood.  This included placing students in one of four inside spaces with varying levels of green, the greenest being the Millington greenhouse and the least-green being a windowless room in Millington.  Our results were very compelling: the rooms with “indoor green” improved participants’ moods significantly more than the control room.

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Using SMS to Describe The Fading Mechanisms of Organic Red Dyes

When thinking about the great artists of our time, Da Vinci, Picasso, or Monet, to name a few, one comes to realize how important their contributions were to shaping the progression of our society. But as time goes on the masterpieces we cherish fade away, even under the care of the finest museums. Vibrant pigments become a dull semblance of what they once were, sometimes even changing color completely. So how can we preserve an artist’s original intent, letting their work be studied for decades to come? With chemistry.

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