Wrapping Up The Echo: Week 3 Update

This week marked the wrap up of my initial examination of The Colonial Echo. I’ve looked through hundreds of student pictures and articles that chronicle the years at William and Mary. As I’ve moved through the years since 1899, I’ve seen a definite shift in the inclusiveness and diversity of the culture at William and Mary. Soon after African American students were admitted into the undergraduate class, black students started forming groups like the Black Student Organization and fraternities and sororities like Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma Theta, and Zeta Phi Beta. Aside from these spaces created on campus for specific ethnic, racial, or cultural identities, previously all white organizations eventually became integrated as well.

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Week #5 Progress

This week I used another method to acquire more chemical information of our samples. The method is called Infrared Spectroscopy (IR). It records the vibration modes of chemical bonds in the examined chemicals. By interpreting the IR spectrum for the sample, we are able to determine the kinds of functional groups exist in our sample. Moreover, by tracking the changes in IR spectra of one sample over a certain timescale, chemists are able to monitor the changes in chemical composition of the sample and speculate about the probable chemical reactions happened during the span of time.

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The Beetle Eggs Have Started Hatching! Blog Post 2

On Wednesday of last week (June 19th), I examined the dry grass stems where the longhorned milkweed beetles oviposited and discovered that many were filled with eggs and a few hatched larvae! Each of the nine beetle habitats, which are ventilated rearing boxes in the greenhouse containing the stems, sand, fresh milkweed leaves, and the beetles, contained approximately twenty stems and between ten and fourteen beetles. Each box contained an average of just over 500 eggs, which is much more than we originally expected.  I transferred the stems from the beetle habitats to a kiddy pool containing over thirty-five, small (25-35 cm tall) milkweed plants. The larvae will feed on the roots of these plants in order to grow a little bit bigger before they are introduced to our experimental plants.

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Week 5: Bridging the Linguistic Gap

“Lina if you add “-s” to the end of a word it becomes plural, meaning there are more than one. For instance, how many chairs do you see here?” Lina looks very focused as she slowly counts in English, “One…two…three…” In response, I ask “Is that more than one?” “YES! So you add an “s” to the end! ChairS!” she jubilantly exclaims. Every day after work one of my co-fellows or I teach our coworker’s seven-year-old cousin English grammar. Because in a country so ethnically (and linguistically) diverse and whose main language (Lao) has such a small international presence, oftentimes English is required to get a better job.

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