Blog Post 6

This week was productive in an odd fashion. While our lab meetings focused on aphantasia, I still got a tremendous amount of work done. Emma and I continued to reach out to school districts and completed a draft of our introductory survey for the participants in the study. We can finally begin scripting videos for use in the study, which will probably focus on topics like mitosis, evolution and speciation.

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Week 4

This week I am continuing to enter the endless data into an excel spreadsheet regarding the topic I mentioned last week:

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Week 4: side project

This week, a tangent was added on to my main research project.  The main idea is that closely related milkweed species can and do hybridize with each other.  The two species we are focusing on for this side project are Asclepias syriaca, common milkweed, and Asclepias exaltata, poke milkweed.  These two species prefer different conditions, but often grow close enough together to cross pollinate.  A. exaltata prefers more water and partial sun while A. syriaca is drought tolerant and prefers full sun.  This means that A. exaltata is often found at forest edges and A. syriaca is most common in fields.  You can probably think of many examples of places that these two habitats border each other.  In theory, a hybrid between A. syriaca and A. exaltata would have a blend of traits from each parental species.  In a time of declining forest habitat and changing climate, hybrid species may have the best of both worlds.  Plants may be able to gain favorable characteristics to tolerate changing conditions far more quickly than animals due to their ability to hybridize.

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Data in Four Dimensions (WEEK 5)

As I mentioned in the previous blog post, I suspect that warmer ocean temperatures correlate with higher rates of rift propagation. However, throughout the Amery Ice Shelf, the depths of it range from roughly 300 meters at the calving front (point at the end of the AIS, where ice typically breaks off from) to 1,200 meters at the calving front (point at which the ice is no longer attached to the underlying bedrock). Because I do not know how thick the ice is that directly surrounds the rift, I compiled as many relevant depths as I could that could be in contact with that specific portion of the AIS.

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Week 3: George Washington University Special Collections

This week, I went to Washington, D.C. to visit the George Washington University Special Collections to read and examine the League for Progress in Architecture Records. The description of the records implied that there would be insight into John J. Boylan’s stance and influence on the Jefferson Memorial, but the records were mostly letters from architects in the League to members of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Commission (TJMC).

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