Week 7 at the National Assembly for Wales

It’s my last week at my internship! I feel like I blinked and it’s over, I really don’t know how this happened. This week has just been all about wrapping up loose ends. I finally finished my research on homelessness and I’m incredibly excited for the end result; now that I’ve finished the preliminary work, the homelessness white paper can begin to be assembled. The work I’ve done and the eventual paper gives me the chance to say I’m published, at least in terms of doing most of the research for an important government publication, which is so exciting! It’s amazing that I get the experience of having done the work for a paper that will lead to some incredibly interesting and ground-breaking policy being implemented and I’m very proud of what I was able to accomplish with that.

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Harry Potter & The Getty Center

We had a busy few days this past weekend here at the Getty! I helped out with a cosmos-themed Ever Present event, part of our series featuring performance art, on Saturday, and this past Sunday, we hosted a talk on Harry Potter and the medieval bestiary. Public Programs put on both of these events as tie-ins to ongoing exhibitions: Ever Present with “The Wondrous Cosmos in Medieval Manuscripts,” and Harry Potter with “Book of Beasts: The Bestiary in the Medieval World,” our current Special Exhibition.

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Week 6

During this week, I continued with CRISPR-Cas9 in which I added the European PET111 gene into the migrant strain and vise-versa. Then I left the plates in an incubator and waited for the colonies to grow. After 3.5 days, on a NAT antibiotic plate that was KAN antibiotic resistant, very tiny colonies started to grow up. I swapped three of the colonies and performed a PCR and only one of the colonies worked. The next step is to get the PCR sequenced to verify that the gRNA is actually in the plasmid, which would ensure the CRISPER-Cas9 worked.

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Week 7

We were still not getting the desired results for some of the iodocyanocuprates, we tried a mixture of water and acetone as the solvent. I started this using the ethylpyridinium salt. All of them came out looking different under room light, but under blacklight they were all the same color. I repeated this procedure with the same mixtures of water and acetone with the methylpyridinium and butylpyridinium salts with CuI and CuCN. The mixtures with the methylpyridinium in them seemed to be brighter and more luminescent when there was more acetone in the mixture, although many of them did not have much luminescence. The mixtures with the butylpyridinium were also brighter in room light in the mixtures with more acetone, but none of them showed luminescence. We then tried a mixture of dried acetone and dried toluene for the butylpyridinium. This seemed to be closer to the desired product. Atomic Absorption was performed on and this showed that we did not get the desired product.

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Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives: Fiske Kimball Papers

The Philadelphia Museum of Art Library and Archives was my last stop in the series of archives that I visited this summer. There, I looked through the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Commission (TJMC) records in the Fiske Kimball Papers. According to the Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Fiske Kimball was “an art historian and architect who served for thirty years as director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art (1925-1955) and for thirty-one years as chairman of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation’s Restoration Committee (1924-1955).” The papers contained correspondence, periodicals, photographs, and newspaper clippings from his time as a member of the TJMC. 

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