Senate Internship: 06/24-07/07

Hi all! If there’s one thing this job is not, that would be predictable. Each week and each day is a surprise, constantly throwing new problems, tasks, and opportunities at you—I love it. Last week started off with a surprise: I gave my first tour. This was an opportunity for improvisation not only because I did not know until one hour before, but also because it was mistakenly scheduled right in the middle of an evacuation drill. Evidently, no one else in the scheduling process picked up on this, so the morning was completely chaotic. After leaving early from the Senate office buildings for the Capitol to avoid the drill, I had to juggle calls from three separate groups scheduled for a tour, all in different locations and basically lost now that plan A was out the window. Long story short, I handled it.

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Senate Internship: 06/10-06/23

Hi all! Still figuring out all the ins and outs of life on the Hill, bit by bit. My Metro navigation skills are honed, and I finally got a monthly pass so I don’t need to constantly reload my card. Living in a city is much more liberating than I imagined; I can pretty much go do anything I want in a way that is not sustainable on campus without a car. The business formal dress code has taken some adjusting to as well, but I like wearing suits to work.

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Senate Internship: 06/03-06/09

Hi all! My name is Jack, and I am a rising Junior at W&M. I am an International Relations major, minoring in Film and Economics. This summer, I am spending 10 weeks as a legislative intern for a Democratic senator from my home state. I will refrain from mentioning “the boss” (that’s what everybody calls her around the office) by name in the interest of privacy for the office. The press team would prefer we don’t even mention the Senator’s name on LinkedIn until the internship is complete.

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Research Update 2: Oh So Many Oysters!

My first three weeks of lab work have gone very smoothly!  The first week I started off as the only student in the lab which left for long and quiet days.  Now there are up to six other people in the lab with me leaving for a much more talkative and bustling day!  I have officially analyzed 1600 shells which is incredible; at the start of my work that seemed so far away!  Most of the features I have analyzed have followed the patterns of my hypothesis that most of the oysters from site 44YO0797 are intertidal oysters, meaning that are generally small, rounded (low HLR), lack sponge parasitism, not deeply cupped (low LVC), and have attachment scars indicative of nearshore substrates.  However, early this week I discovered four features that veer from this trend—features 1064, 1062, 1063 and 1065.  While these features still contain a number of small, likely intertidal shells, they revealed a large supply of what have been identified as subtidal oysters.  They are identified as such because the oysters are generally large, elongated (high HLR), have a high percentage of sponge parasitism, and are deeply cupped (high LVC).   The site report for 44YO0797 states that “features 1062, 1063, and 1064 were all also extremely similar in appearance.  These features were also located in a straight line, and were spaced about even distances apart: Features 1062 and 1063 were 3.3’ apart center to center, and 1.3’ apart at their nearest points. Features 1063 and 1064 were 3.8’ apart center to center, but also 1.3’ apart at their nearest points” (186).  This allows for the estimation that these three features were contemporary, meaning the remains of a single occupation at the site, likely Middle Woodland.  Below are some images of the larger shells found.

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