When Oysters Can Fly

A major part of my research is sectioning oyster shells. This means taking a shell that is usually hundreds of years old and slicing it in half to count the growth bands. This requires the use of a saw that is bigger than I am, and an oyster shell that is only a few inches long.

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Know it All?

Sometimes I feel discouraged because I will tell someone that I am an archaeologist and they then assume that I know everything about every site there is. People are especially interested in discussing Rome and Egypt, which are totally not in my knowledge area.

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Opportunities

I met a new student at William and Mary today. In our discussions, we stumbled upon the topic of researching with a professor. He told me that everyone he has talked to has an “in”, and he didn’t know how to get there. I told him that it was simple: ask a professor if you can do research with them.

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Shell Back Attack: A Tale of Data Recovery

As one phase of my research this summer draws to a close and the next phase begins, I would like to take a moment to reflect upon the joys, pains, and frustrations that are in play during the process of data collection.

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Oyster Shell Analysis at a Native American Site

For the past year I have been working closely with Dr. Martin Gallivan of the anthropology department at the College of William and Mary. His research focuses on Algonquian speaking groups in the Tidewater region, and I hope to contribute to that work by doing research at a Native Site along the York River.

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