The Final Database of Anti-Immigrant Organizations, Part 2: An explanation of our data, methods, and coding mechanism

Each restrictionist website was then classified as pertaining to one or several types of groups. Organization Type 1 was Informational. The main objective of these groups was to educate the public about the destructive effects of immigrants and current U.S. immigration policy. Organization Type 2 was Advocacy. These groups focused on lobbying for political change directly and educating others on how to affect change at the local, state, and national levels. Organization Type 3 was titled Border Security. The primary objective of this type of group was to secure and provide constant surveillance of the U.S.-Mexico Border. Citizens’ groups or volunteer militias, such as Chris Simcox’s Minutemen, were the most common type of organization included in the Type 3 category. Organization Type 4 was Legal/Litigation. These groups focused on enforcing immigration laws exclusively through legal channels.

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The Final Database of Anti-Immigrant Organizations, Part 1: An explanation of our data, methods, and coding mechanism

            Our final data set includes 49 different restrictionist websites comprised of 41 individual organizations and 8 coalition groups. This blog will discuss Professor Sohoni and my data collection process, specifically focusing on (1) the selection criteria used to determine which anti-immigrant groups were included in our final database, (2) the basis of our analysis/evaluation of useful restrictionist websites, (3) the final coding mechanism used to classify the arguments posited by each organization, and, finally, (4) a summary of our multi-level approach to analyze the resultant data.

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Getting Started (Part 2)

While these past few weeks have been heavy on collecting data and light on actual data analysis, several aspects of this research have been extremely interesting. The process of finding historical articles which document the empirical relationship between immigration and crime has been particularly fascinating. The assertion that immigrants exhibit higher rates of delinquency than their native born counterparts has been posited in numerous articles since the beginning of the 20th century. For example, in his article, “Problems of Immigration”, Frank P. Sargent (the Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization from 1902-1908) suggests that most immigrants add a “dangerous and unwholesome element” to American society and should thus be carefully inspected upon arrival (1904). Sargent emphasizes that immigrants who “become burdens … the indigent, and the morally depraved, the physically and mentally diseased, the shiftless” should not be allowed to enter the country.

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Getting Started (Part 1)

Over the course of the past three weeks I have spend the majority of my time collecting data to advance three specific areas of Professor Sohoni’s research on the immigrant-crime nexus. In an attempt to keep this blog post clear and [somewhat] organized, I will first explain the topics I have been researching and how the information found thus far pertains to the initial steps in my work with Professor Sohoni. I will then reflect on the beginning steps of my research experience and discuss new topics (related to the immigrant-crime nexus) that are of interest to me.

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Analyzing the Link Between Immigration and Crime Levels in the United States

Hello Everyone!

My name is Lauren McAuliffe, and I am currently a rising senior at the College. I am pursuing a double major in Sociology and Hispanic Studies with a particular interest in migration studies. Throughout my academic career at William and Mary, I have become increasingly interested with data that demonstrate how immigrant communities are effectively lowering crime rates. Through their capacity to reinvest “social capital” (as defined by Robert Putnam in Bowling Alone: the Collapse and Revival of American Community) in underserved communities across the country, immigrant enclaves are having a positive impact on American society.

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