Final Thoughts

Though this is my final blog, I am still not done with script. My main roadblock is that I decide when to finish the project – there is no exact deadline. After editing it several times I have reached a point where I am not completely satisfied but I don’t know if I ever will be. I have also read it so many times that the thrill of translation is not as present. Earlier this week I decided that I will edit it one final time and then email it to Esteban. Now I just have to find the motivation for that final read-through.

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First Edits

 

I wrote the following entry more than a month ago, but I just realized that I never posted it. So it’s not quite up-to-date, but it will provide some contrast to my final blog:

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Soap Opera in the Script

Four weeks in, I am deep into translation. I am becoming attached to the script – I translate to find out what’s going to happen next. The story has gone in directions that I never would have predicted. Esteban Insausti’s other works that I have seen have had more subtle intentions and mellower moods. Granted, I’ve only seen his documentaries. Club de Jazz has turned out to be in the vein of soap operas – murder, sex, and drugs frequent the plot.

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Trying out Translation

Summer started for me on May 8th, but I didn’t build up the motivation to start my summer work until three weeks later. I kept telling myself that I could wait until I moved back to campus and was in an environment more conducive to serious work. Of course, once I arrived in Williamsburg, I needed a few days to “relax.” The reason for my procrastination was my memory of attempting to start the translation at the beginning of last semester. Before academics took over any outside work, I spent one night translating and completed a total of two pages. As a result, I was slightly anxious that this whole project might have been a little too much for my skill level and patience for slow work.

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Sonja Paviour Abstract

Hello!

Fall semester of 2011 I took a sophomore seminar on Cuban Film. We took a multidisciplinary approach in studying films that trace Cuban history from before and after the reign of Castro. Professor Stock exposed us to a range of documentaries – some reportorial and others more abstract but all reflected constructions of Cuban national identity. One of my favorite directors, Esteban Insausti, had a more radical approach and took his camera out in the streets to document the struggles and joys experienced by Cuba’s homeless – “los locos.” Most of the documentaries that we previously encountered had focused on what about Cuba’s political and social obstacles were uniquely Cuban – Insausti, by contrast, illustrated how their fights were in fact universal. One of the homeless men that he interviewed in his film Existen,They Exist”, tells Insausti that “en la vida cubana, lo mejor estar alegre.” In Cuban life, it is best to be happy.

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