Pillars of Propaganda Re-defined

As is often the case with research, upon actually beginning an in-depth study, I found that the information I was uncovering led me in a slightly different direction from the one I initially intended. The initial intent of my research, as presented in my abstract, was to explore the role of propaganda in religious architecture during Republican Rome. As my research progressed, most of the more interesting items of propaganda were–unsurprisingly–dedicated by Republican generals. Although the temples were still interesting and I believe there would have been much there, I decided that the opportunity for more original research lay with these generals. As a result, I tweaked my research to focus on dedications made by Roman generals; specifically, on military dedications (that is, dedications they made in connection to particular military campaigns). As is usual, the best way to draw conclusions concerning specifics of what these dedications represented to the socio-political climate of Rome was to draw comparisons. Although most often people tend to compare Republican Rome to the Imperial Principate, I decided not to make a chronological comparison. Instead, I chose to compare dedications made at home to those made abroad, specifically to those made in Greece. I also chose to limit the time period to the periods between the Second Macedonian War and the Achaean War, when there is a particularly rich pool of evidence to draw from in regards to military dedications in both Rome and Greece.

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Hooping: Not Just for Children

Within the first four scenes of Annie Baker’s Circle Mirror Transformation, two characters have to hula hoop onstage. While hula hooping is definitely a fun game to play when we’re six years old, hula hooping at the age of 20 seems a little more challenging. As we rehearsed the scene, it seemed like hula hooping would prove difficult for our two actors. The character who owns the hula hoop, Theresa, a 35 year old actress, is an expert “hooper,” as she calls herself. James, a 60 year old economics professor, who also has to hula hoop in the play, does not have to be very good at it, but he has to at least hoop for a few seconds.

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Rehearsals, Costumes, and Lights

After 9 rehearsals (or 18 hours) I have finished my 10 minute and 30 second piece which will be presented at An Evening of Dance at the end of March.  All of my costumes have arrived and the look great on my dancers and truly exemplify the meaning of my choreography.  They are red and black.  The costumes are exactly what I wanted.  My costumes also took nearly 3 months to arrive, so at times I was concerned that I would not get them before the performance.

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Food Scarcities, North American Flour, US Merchants’ Monopolies, and Rebellion in Late-Colonial Caracas 1797-1810

I’ve just returned from a very successful, targeted research trip to Caracas, Venezuela, to consult the city’s Municipal Archive thanks to my Student Research Grant through the Charles Center and the Reves Center for International Studies.  Last year as  a Fulbright Fellow from 2010-2011, I had a unique and special opportunity to spend nine months conducting the final phase of my dissertation research– investigating the foreign trade of late-colonial Venezuela at the Archivo General de la Nación and the Academía Nacional de la Historia.

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Public Health Research in Nepal

It’s been exactly a month since I last wrote the blog regarding my research project in Nepal. Within this month of January, I, along with other members of our team Swastha Nepal, got to have an experience of a lifetime while we were in the country. I could not update the blogs about my project while in Nepal since we were detached from computers and pretty much all forms of technology while we were in the village. However, now that I am back to civilization and have access to the internet, here’s a summary of the project and my Nepal trip experience.

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