Protein Immobilization Research Final Update

As the last week of research approaches, it is rewarding to look back and see all that I have learned. The last two weeks have been extremely productive: I’ve successfully cloned SSO into another plasmid and expressed both the wild type and a mutant version. Furthermore, I’ve been able to run reactions showing the sustained activity of the mutated protein, and thus its potential in biosensors. My aim now is to express at least one more active mutant, and immobilize the mutants in different conditions. If research continues to progress the way it has, we will hopefully have enough for a paper in the fall.

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Native American Healing Music Update: The Role of Women

My research has led me to explore the Library of Congress and the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. I’ve listened to most of the available recorded music that they have from Folkway Festivals and ethnographer field work. While listening to this music and looking through field notes, I began to note a pattern in Native American Healing and Ceremonial Music. Much of the music that is available consists of male vocalists and instrumentalists. However, the more late the date of the recording, say the 1990’s versus the 1920’s, the more female vocalists are featured within the repertoire. After noticing this phenomenon I also happened upon an article published by the Smithsonian that focused on the ways in which women have been largely ignored over history in the recording and research of Native American Music. This concept is interesting to me, as I am someone who is quite supportive of women’s empowerment and advancement, so I want to follow this pattern of information and see where it takes me in regards to learning about how and why Native American women have gained more ground in music in the recent years.

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“The Origin of Barbadian Ceramics”–an introduction

As this is my first blog entry, I would like to both give a short blurb about myself, as well as briefly outline my research for this summer. I plan to use the subsequent blog entries during my research itself.

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My Own Project: ER and preventable care admits

So I finally finished my own project. I used the same data I’ve been working with (quarterly inpatient data from Florida), but now only focusing on two types of patients: ER admits and patients with preventable conditions. Preventable conditions are diagnoses for which timely and effective ambulatory care reduces the risks of hospitalization by either preventing the onset of or managing an illness or condition. Examples include pneumonia, congestive heart failure, asthma, and immunizable conditions. As a result, preventable conditions are frequently used as a measure of health care access and so I hypothesized that during a recession there would be more of these types of conditions. ER admits are an important subgroup because hospitals must provide everyone with a minimum degree of service even if the patient has no insurance and cannot pay. The ER is the only part of a hospital that is required to treat everyone, so I hypothesized that during a recession there would be more ER admits. My dependent variables of interest are the number of ER admits, preventable condition admits, and PC through ER admits for each hospital. My explanatory variables were the county unemployment rate and county population controls and hospital and time controls. When I only looked at the effect of unemployment on ER or PC admits, the effect was not significantly different from zero. However, when I looked at patients that met both criteria, the effect was positive and significant. In other words, during recessions there are more ER admits with diseases that could have been prevented with proper health care.

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