Closets and Classrooms: Conclusion

Looking back on my summer research, I am struck by a couple different things.

First, I am painfully aware of just how much more there is to learn about the experiences of LGBTQ teachers. The oral histories I collected certainly dug deep into the lives of my interviewees, shining a light on things they went through, sometimes heartbreaking, and revealing how these experiences shaped my interviewees as people and as educators. That being said, I can’t help feeling like I barely scratched the surface of the topic. There are so many more LGBTQ teachers I didn’t get the chance to speak with, so many more stories that are still untold. I hope that, in the future, I get another chance to interview more queer teachers, to continue to bring their unique and valuable stories to light.

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Closets and Classrooms: Age

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post about how all of the LGBTQ teachers I had interviewed had expressed feelings of fear regarding being open about their sexuality at school. Another common theme that I found across several of my interviews is the concept of age. While the interviewees saw their age affecting their comfort with being out at school in different ways, the idea that age played a role in their being out or not being out to colleagues and students came up in interview after interview.

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Closets and Classrooms: Sampling

I’ve always been more interested in the findings of studies than in the methods, but I can’t in good conscience neglect methods forever. So let’s talk about sampling, shall we?

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Closets and Classrooms: Fear

Over the past several weeks, I have conducted six interviews with LGBTQ teachers in the Williamsburg/Richmond area. While each individual I interviewed had a unique perspective on what it means to be a queer teacher, there were some consistencies that came out of each interview, some patterns that emerged. In each one of the interviews I have conducted so far, my respondent expressed a deep sense of fear, identifying that as a driving force that determined how they conducted themselves in the school setting.

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