Going Turtling! : Week 1 and Project Rundown

Week 1 of the turtle project was a fairly slow start. We caught 3 turtles overall, 3 beautiful males. All around 13 cm length of carapace. In terms of by-catch we caught several crabs, 2 silver perch, and a rather large flounder! It was an exciting start to the project, both my partner and I always love to interact with the animals, even if they aren’t the animals we are looking for!

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A Sad Introduction to the Terrapin Project

After many weeks of fieldwork, it is time to tell the long story of the research that has been done. While the entirety of the research itself has been overwhelmingly positive, The first day of surveying the work site was cast in a grim light upon a depressing finding. My research partner and I, along with our lab professor and his assistant, paddled out to the Catlett Islands to evaluate where the best spots for pots would be. It was a windy, sunny day, and our spirits were light as we made our way out of Cedar Bush Creek to look for both suitable sites and Terrapins. When entering one of the many small bays of the Islands, we found several old crab pot buoys, with rusted metal rings attached. Luckily enough, nothing was caught in the first few, but the last one we pulled up was a new crab pot and had yet to deteriorate to the level of the others. Sadly, when we pulled it out of the water, it was filled with Diamond-backed Terrapins.

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Abstract: Ecotherapy and Park Prescriptions healing through nature

Hello, my name is Alexis Jenkins and I am a sophomore at William & Mary. I am an anthropology and environmental science double major and this summer I will be assisting Professor Dorothy Ibes with her research in the Parks Research Lab.

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Abstract: Ecotherapy interventions encouraging healing through nature

Ecotherapy is a form of psychology that allows nature to encourage growth and healing. This healing can be in the form of stress, cognitive fatigue, or mental illness. Healing with nature has become more important in recent years because humans have broken their deep relationship with nature. Human connection with nature is important because of a term Edward Wilson created called “biophilia,” which describes humans’ innate desire to connect with nature and other life. Recent studies have indicated that ecotherapy practices have reduced stress, depression and anxiety, and have increased pro-social behavior and overall well-being. Some interventions include horticultural therapy and animal-assisted therapy, while more commonplace ecotherapy practices include mindfulness walks, learning more about local nature, spending more time outside in general, and adding more greenspace to an indoor environment.

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End Summer, Enter Fall

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