Black Students’ Perceptions of their Self-Determination in School- Abstract

Self-determination skills are met when three requirements are met: the student must feel autonomy, competence, and belongingness. In the classroom, self-determination skills are partially dependent upon teacher focus on the student inside the classroom and the empowerment they give them to act. Self-determination skills will boost the ability for African Americans to become casual agents. Most research connecting casual agency theory and self-determination skills have focused on children with disabilities. The project I will work on with Dr. Parker will seek to understand the relationship between the causal agent theory and self-determination skills in African American students without disabilities. Research focusing on the success of African American students has focused on personal agency and environmental factors impacting their capabilities, but not enough research focuses on the self-determination skills and in understanding the internal strengths African American youth might have. It is important to understand these internal strengths in African American youth because the education system was not created for African Americans (Lozenski, 2017).  Therefore, the question we intend to answer is whether or not empowering African American students’ belief in their self-determination skills can lead to them becoming better casual agents for their own personal success. From the project, we hope to provide new knowledge on the link between self-determination skills and casual agency with students beyond those with disabilities. The goal of the project is to inform the public on how the education system can be improved to aid our African American youth in becoming empowered in the classroom setting so that they can be successful in academics, activities, and future aspirations.

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Advantages of the Oral History Association’s Publications

My biggest find was stumbling upon the published transcripts of the early Oral History Association meetings. The first two were published books, all other publications after that were periodicals distributed by the OHA, with the seventh year’s periodical no longer being a transcript, but a series of essays, book reviews, and a bibliography.

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The Beginning of Oral History in the 1930’s

Other than the achievements of Allan Nevins, there are two major components of oral history in the 1930’s and 40’s. The first I knew I needed to research was the work of Forrest Pogue. Pogue had been repeatedly mentioned by later authors on the topic as an individual who had greatly influenced the public’s interest in oral history with his work “Pogue’s War”. “Pogue’s War” narrated Forrest Pogue’s time as an oral historian with the US army during D-Day and beyond on the European front during WWII. I was able to use this book to discover the other historians in Forrest Pogue’s unit. By researching these individuals, I discovered that many of them wrote and published narratives on their work during WWII.

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Researching Allan Nevins

In order to understand the meteoric rise of oral history material in the 1960’s and 70’s, I needed to first find the point where oral history began. Columbia University has long been the standard for all matters oral history from archive development to interview standards, and Allan Nevins, a former Professor there, was often cited as the founder of Oral history in my preliminary readings. I decided to start by reading the introductions he’d written in his published work, especially in his biography of Henry Ford in which he’d heavily used interviews of individuals who’d known Henry Ford to inform and fill out his narrative. This book had often been mentioned when searching articles and reviews of Allan Nevin’s work as the beginning of Allan Nevins use of oral history.

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Abstract: The Rise of Oral Histories

Hello, my name is Mason Davis. I’m currently a Junior at William and Mary and am majoring in History. This summer I will be conducting research in order to answer the question “What caused oral histories to increase in number and use from 1930 to present?”

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