Conclusion

The goal for this summer was to have sampling, DNA extraction, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), and fragment analysis sent off (to be later analyzed) completed on all 400 of the subsamples. Sampling and DNA extraction were finished. PCR unfortunately was not, delaying fragment analysis as well. Though the PCR protocol was developed during spring semester of 2017, new primers and a host of other problems made this step tricky. The first batch sent off for analysis came back blank, requiring adjusting of the protocol and the second had nebulous results. A delay in shipment meant that only 3 of the 7 primers were available for much of the summer. However, all extractions were completed successfully, and in the last remaining weeks of July, PCR was done on all 400 of the plants for 3 of the primers. All PCR products were shipped off for fragment analysis. Training began on using a fragment analysis software, so once results do come back, analysis will be smoother.

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Labwork (PCR)

Following DNA extractions, it was time for amplification of DNA through Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). PCR amplifies the DNA by denaturing, copying, and synthesizing over and over again. Denaturing occurs via temperature, first during the DNA extraction process, and then again using the Thermocline machine (or PCR machine). The thermocline helps to regulate temperature allowing for PCR to go through its different steps, such as synthesis or denaturing. Synthesis occurs using a special polymerase Taq.

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Labwork

Following the collection of data and samples, it was time for lab work to begin. The first step of my procedure was DNA extractions. With around 800 plant samples, I quickly realized financially and time wise doing all 800 would not be practical. This led to many discussions on how to subsample. Was it better to do more transects, with fewer plants from each transect? More plants, with fewer coverage of overall transects? How do you account for the difference in densities between transects? Overtime, with more and more discussions, it became clear that sampling more transects would be a better option, even if that meant fewer plants per transect. Additionally, for any transect with ~30 or fewer plants, the entire transect would be sampled. For any plant over that, a subsample would be done using a random number generator to randomly select which plants should be extracted.

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Check your cells before you wreck your cells

Amazing that six weeks have already passed! While research has been continuing at a rapid pace, the results, unfortunately, have not. Last time I mentioned that we haven’t found the right conditions to synthesize the proteins that we want to study. After much repetition of experiments and confused looks at the results (for instance, the protein that we work with is called Green Fluorescent Protein…it was not green) we have finally (hopefully) found the source of the hold-up: bad cells. That is right. The cells that we used to synthesize the protein that we then study and manipulate had somehow become contaminated such that the cells were not properly taking up the plasmid (DNA material) that they needed to obtain the ability to manufacture the protein of interest. New stock cells have been made and research can continue with more promising results.

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