Implicit Stereotypes Toward Body Type and Cognitive Responses to Food

Implicit cognitive biases or stereotypes toward certain body types have been found to affect individual food choice (McFerran, Dahl, Fitzsimons, & Morales, 2009). Additionally, it is becoming increasingly common for prominent influencers to encourage the consumption of certain foods or dietary practices through Instagram and other forms of social media. The goal of this study is to take advantage of this trend to understand how stereotypes about a social media influencer affect people’s perception of foods.

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Traumatic Stress and Risk Versus Resilience in First Generation College Students

First generation students tend to have lower rates of college completion. Why is this the case? Well before diving in any further, first generation students vary in definition, but for research purposes, can be defined as students whose parents did not graduate from a 4-year college. One factor that might contribute to these lower rates of persistence involves traumatic and stressful experiences. The study I’m conducting this summer will therefore investigate 1) the rates of exposure to trauma in FG students and 2) the effects of the trauma on resilience of FG students.

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More on Stress & Depression: Next Steps for the Mentoring Study

Hi everyone!!

It’s hard to believe that the summer is coming to a close. For those of you who have been reading since the very beginning, thank you!! In this last blog post I want to return to the findings I covered two posts ago (Stress and Depression Matter: Analysis of Preliminary Results).

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Mentors are Necessary: The Need for Mentors to Underserved Children

Hi everyone!

It’s been a busy couple of weeks in the lab but I am back and have lots to talk about. Last time I had some pretty exciting results to share with y’all and next week I’ll have some more findings to talk about. This week I wanted to take a quick step back from my data and discuss the necessity of mentoring as a whole.

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June: Full of Lit Reviews and Statistical Blues

My Honors Fellowship project has been off to a roaring start so far! Well, as “roaring” as nascent research can be. I hit the pages running in the beginning of the month, reading as much about resilience to mental illness, grit as a construct, emotional psychopathology, long distance running, and the benefits of mindfulness as possible. My job is reading- how lucky am I?!

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