Running the Study

After several weeks of design, preparation, and last-minute adjustments, I am now in the process of recruiting and running participants in my research study. In the past three and a half weeks, I have been coordinating with students on campus to come to the lab and get the data that I need, and so far I am very pleased with the turnout.

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Participant Recruitment

For my study, I am looking to recruit at at least 120 male and female undergrads from William and Mary. Going into this, I am aware that recruiting male participants is a common struggle in most psychology research, and I experienced some of that frustration in getting results for my pilot survey. However, I am interested in any gender differences regarding the effect of implicit stereotypes on cognitive responses to food, so I will do my best to pull participants as equally as possible.

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Final Preparations

The last week has been very busy, as I have been preparing all of the stimuli for my study. I have spent a lot of time working with Qualtrics in sending out two surveys to pilot my stimuli. Perhaps the most difficult task so far was finding a diverse sample to pilot my images (who could not be participants later), and getting complete results quickly.

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Post 2

Over the past weeks of research preparation, the design for my study has transformed quite a bit in order to fit a more dependable method of measurement and a more narrow research question.

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Implicit Stereotypes Toward Body Type and Cognitive Responses to Food

Implicit cognitive biases or stereotypes toward certain body types have been found to affect individual food choice (McFerran, Dahl, Fitzsimons, & Morales, 2009). Additionally, it is becoming increasingly common for prominent influencers to encourage the consumption of certain foods or dietary practices through Instagram and other forms of social media. The goal of this study is to take advantage of this trend to understand how stereotypes about a social media influencer affect people’s perception of foods.

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