Results from Trial 1/ Starting Trial 2

At the beginning of this week, I looked at my Trial 1 slides for no treatment/ chloroquine that I made the week before. I examined the twelve chloroquine slides and took pictures of those slides. I need to perform statistics on the slides but I will do that throughout this week. In general, the majority of the cells on the chloroquine slides were not viable and the cells that were alive were scarce. One explanation for this could have been forceful washing during the cell fixation process. This week when I do cell fixation, I will make sure to be careful when washing the cells using the autopipette. I have also done cell culture for Trial 2 of no treatment/chloroquine. I will add my DNA conditions to my cells today and add the autophagy inhibitor drug, chloroquine, to the cells tomorrow.

Coming to Terms with the Process

Hello! I hope you all had a wonderful last few weeks. I have been very busy in the lab lately and am eager to tell you all about that.

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Seven days, Population eight, and Nine Ball

In the lab this week, I continued to transfer beads for my first cycle of evolution this summer. I was really impressed with myself because I managed to go the entire week without dropping a bead. It can be so difficult at times to get the beads out of the glass tubes, to wash them, and then put in the microcentrifuge tubes without dropping one or messing up at a single step. I am typically holding my breath the entire time because I am so anxious about it. This is such a huge accomplish for me and am glad that I have the opportunity to document this eternally. Other than my project, this week I helped out Dr. Murphy with some of her ongoing projects. I learned how to streak and made YPD glycerol plates.

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Defrosting, Detours, and a Debrief on Evolution

Last week was my first week of summer research. I was actually very excited to come back to campus. Relaxing at home is wonderful and much needed after finals, but with all the time in the world on my hands I started to get a little antsy. At the end of the semester, I paused my experiment by storing my yeast populations in glycerol and freezing them. Freezing the yeast puts them in a dormant state. When I returned for the summer, I knew I would be able to start exactly where I left off. For the first couple of days, all I did was prepare myself to start evolving again by getting all my equipment ready. I grow the yeast in glass tubes filled with evolution medium, basically sugar water. I spent a good portion of Monday autoclaving (sterilizing) and washing old tubes, making evolution medium and filling up clean tubes with it. At the beginning of last week, all but one of the autoclaves in the ISC was broken, so it was quite an adventure having to go back and forth to the third floor to get all my work done.

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The Final Post: Concluding my research, but not my promotion of ecotherapy

Alongside my research with Dr. Ibes at the Parks Research Lab, I have been interning for Wildrock Nature Playscape, a non-profit in Crozet, Virginia. Via this internship, I will be leading an ecotherapy retreat for college students. The goal of this retreat is to teach college students what ecotherapy is, and then help them plan an ecotherapy initiative on their college campus. For more information, please contact me at dcspitz@email.wm.edu, as William & Mary students are welcome on this retreat. Most major schools in Virginia will eventually feature an ecotherapy initiative on their campus. Thus, my research at the Parks Research Lab this summer has aided me in promoting ecotherapy to others.

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